Location

University of Nevada Las Vegas, Science and Education Building

Start Date

9-8-2011 10:15 AM

End Date

9-8-2011 12:00 PM

Description

Quagga Mussels, Dressenia bugensis, are a growing problem in the western United States, particularly in their ability to infest underwater infrastructures and clog water intake pipes and screens of power and treatment plants. Chlorine has been found to be the most effective chemical to get rid of veligers (planktonic larval form of quagga mussels) in the pipes. However, chlorine leaves a residue called trihalomethane, which is a carcinogen at higher concentrations. The purpose of this project is to test the effectiveness of an alternate chemical, chloramines (chlorine and ammonia), which leaves behind little to no residual trihalomethane. Upon experimentation with various dosages of chloramines, it was found that 1.0 mg/l effectively kills approximately 97% of the veligers after an exposure time of approximately 4 hours. Our results provide critical information needed to replace the use of harmful chlorines in drinking water systems.

Keywords

Chloramines; Freshwater mussels – Control; Introduced aquatic organisms – Control; Nonindigenous pests – Control; West (U.S.)

Disciplines

Animal Sciences | Desert Ecology | Environmental Sciences | Public Health | Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecology

Language

English

 
Aug 9th, 10:15 AM Aug 9th, 12:00 PM

The Use of chloramines to eradicate quagga mussel larvae

University of Nevada Las Vegas, Science and Education Building

Quagga Mussels, Dressenia bugensis, are a growing problem in the western United States, particularly in their ability to infest underwater infrastructures and clog water intake pipes and screens of power and treatment plants. Chlorine has been found to be the most effective chemical to get rid of veligers (planktonic larval form of quagga mussels) in the pipes. However, chlorine leaves a residue called trihalomethane, which is a carcinogen at higher concentrations. The purpose of this project is to test the effectiveness of an alternate chemical, chloramines (chlorine and ammonia), which leaves behind little to no residual trihalomethane. Upon experimentation with various dosages of chloramines, it was found that 1.0 mg/l effectively kills approximately 97% of the veligers after an exposure time of approximately 4 hours. Our results provide critical information needed to replace the use of harmful chlorines in drinking water systems.