Document Type

Article

Abstract

Background: Pedestrian crashes are a deterrent to physical activity, especially walking. The purpose of this study was to analyze pedestrian crash characteristics in Clark County, NV and to determine if there was a significant relationship between pedestrian crashes and socio-economic variables.

Methods: Police reported pedestrian crash data collected between January 2009 and December 2011 were analyzed. Frequencies and rates for pedestrian crashes, injuries and deaths were calculated for environmental and human characteristics. Chi square tests were utilized to determine if there were significant differences in environmental and human characteristics for pedestrian injuries and deaths. Zero-inflated negative binomial (ZINB) regression analysis was utilized to determine if there was a significant relationship between pedestrian crashes and socio-economic variables by urban census tracts.

Results: The majority of pedestrian crashes occurred during the day, when it was clear and the roads were dry. There were significant differences in environmental and human characteristics when pedestrian injuries and deaths were compared. Significant predictors of pedestrian crashes by census tract were percent Hispanic, median age, median household income, and population density.

Conclusions: Because pedestrian crashes are a barrier to physical activity, efforts to reduce them should be undertaken. Solutions could positively impact physical activity and walkability.

Disciplines

Community-Based Research | Environmental Health | Medicine and Health | Place and Environment

Permissions

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