Panel Title

Session 1-3-C: Adolescence, Risk, and Gambling

Location

The Mirage Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas, Nevada

Start Date

7-6-2016 2:00 PM

End Date

7-6-2016 3:30 PM

Abstract

Around two thirds of Australian adolescents aged 10-14 years old have gambled in the last year, and rates of problem gambling are up to four times higher among adolescents than in the adult population. Schools provide a unique opportunity to intervene in cognitive and behavioural development, and while several gambling education programs exist in schools across Australia and internationally, few have been empirically evaluated. The purpose of this review was to provide a systematic appraisal of the published research on gambling education programs for adolescents. The review aimed to identify the number and quality of studies that have evaluated gambling education programs, and suggest recommendations for future research. A systematic search was conducted across five separate databases and a total of 17 studies were retained following screening and exclusion.

All of the included studies were efficacious in achieving some pre-post improvements in cognition, beliefs, attitudes, and knowledge. However, many failed to assess behavioural outcomes, and only a few to date have been effective in achieving any significant changes in gambling behaviour. Other methodological issues included the brevity of follow-ups, measurement concerns including loose definitions of adolescent problem gambling. There were also distinct flaws in the content and design of many programs. This review provides a knowledgebase for future research, including some guiding principles for the effective design and evaluation of a gambling education program. Consistencies across successful programs were examined to provide insight into what constitutes an effective gambling education program.

Streaming Media

Gambling Education Programs for Adolescents: A Systematic Review

Keywords

problem gambling; education; prevention; youth; school; program; systematic; adolescent

Disciplines

Cognitive Psychology | Developmental Psychology | Educational Psychology | Mental and Social Health | Psychology | Substance Abuse and Addiction

Comments

Attachment: PDF containing 28 slides; Title slide: School-Based Gambling Education Programs: A Systematic Review

Audio recording of this presentation is attached as a downloadable MP3 audio file, 46.2 MB

This presentation starts at 24:47

13C_KeenBBlaszczynskiAAnjoulFadi_pres_GamblingEducation.mp3 (46231 kB)
Audio recording of presentation

 
Jun 7th, 2:00 PM Jun 7th, 3:30 PM

Gambling Education Programs for Adolescents: A Systematic Review

The Mirage Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas, Nevada

Around two thirds of Australian adolescents aged 10-14 years old have gambled in the last year, and rates of problem gambling are up to four times higher among adolescents than in the adult population. Schools provide a unique opportunity to intervene in cognitive and behavioural development, and while several gambling education programs exist in schools across Australia and internationally, few have been empirically evaluated. The purpose of this review was to provide a systematic appraisal of the published research on gambling education programs for adolescents. The review aimed to identify the number and quality of studies that have evaluated gambling education programs, and suggest recommendations for future research. A systematic search was conducted across five separate databases and a total of 17 studies were retained following screening and exclusion.

All of the included studies were efficacious in achieving some pre-post improvements in cognition, beliefs, attitudes, and knowledge. However, many failed to assess behavioural outcomes, and only a few to date have been effective in achieving any significant changes in gambling behaviour. Other methodological issues included the brevity of follow-ups, measurement concerns including loose definitions of adolescent problem gambling. There were also distinct flaws in the content and design of many programs. This review provides a knowledgebase for future research, including some guiding principles for the effective design and evaluation of a gambling education program. Consistencies across successful programs were examined to provide insight into what constitutes an effective gambling education program.