Panel Title

Session 2-2-A: Researching Problem Gambling

Location

The Mirage Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas, Nevada

Start Date

8-6-2016 10:30 AM

End Date

8-6-2016 12:00 PM

Abstract

Prevention of problem gambling hinges on having research that clearly identifies the variables that are etiologically involved, their temporal sequence, and their causal connections. Longitudinal research is the best way of disentangling the chronology and causal relationships between variables. The present research describes the results of the two major longitudinal studies of gambling in Canada: the Quinte Longitudinal Study (QLS) (n = 4,121) and the Leisure, Lifestyle, Lifecycle Project (LLLP) (n = 1,808). The first part of the presentation describes the stability of gambling classifications over a 5 year period. This is followed by an identification of the univariate and multivariate predictors of future problem gambling and the implications these results have for prevention. The final part of the presentation describes the purpose and methodology of a new longitudinal study in Massachusetts: the Massachusetts Gambling Impact Cohort (MAGIC (n = 3,141).

Keywords

etiology; prevention; longitudinal; problem gambling

Disciplines

Mental and Social Health | Mental Disorders | Psychological Phenomena and Processes | Psychology | Public Affairs, Public Policy and Public Administration | Substance Abuse and Addiction

Comments

Attachment: PDF containing 30 slides

 
Jun 8th, 10:30 AM Jun 8th, 12:00 PM

Etiology and Stability of Problem Gambling

The Mirage Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas, Nevada

Prevention of problem gambling hinges on having research that clearly identifies the variables that are etiologically involved, their temporal sequence, and their causal connections. Longitudinal research is the best way of disentangling the chronology and causal relationships between variables. The present research describes the results of the two major longitudinal studies of gambling in Canada: the Quinte Longitudinal Study (QLS) (n = 4,121) and the Leisure, Lifestyle, Lifecycle Project (LLLP) (n = 1,808). The first part of the presentation describes the stability of gambling classifications over a 5 year period. This is followed by an identification of the univariate and multivariate predictors of future problem gambling and the implications these results have for prevention. The final part of the presentation describes the purpose and methodology of a new longitudinal study in Massachusetts: the Massachusetts Gambling Impact Cohort (MAGIC (n = 3,141).