Panel Title

Session 3-1-A Research-based Evaluations of Promotions and Messages

Location

The Mirage Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas, Nevada

Start Date

9-6-2016 8:30 AM

End Date

9-6-2016 10:00 AM

Abstract

Televised sporting events now contain a plethora of gambling and sports betting promotions, including logos, signage, advertising, sponsored segments and celebrity endorsement. This presentation focuses on how sports bettors respond to these promotions, drawing on research findings from Australia.

A first study examined sports bettors’ responses to these promotions, and whether this varied with problem gambling severity. Surveys with 544 Queensland sports bettors indicated that problem gamblers had highest approval of, felt most encouragement to gamble, and had been influenced to gamble most from these promotions, compared to non-problem and at-risk gamblers. Problem gamblers were also more influenced to bet on sports by contextual factors, particularly certain bet types and promotional appeals.

A second study used a conjoint design to measure responses to 20 simulated promotions amongst 611 regular sports bettors, non-regular sports bettors and non-sports bettors. Type of bet had more utility than type of commentator, type of message appeal and type of promotion. For type of bet, novelty risk-free bets were more enticing than micro-bets, exotic bets and traditional bets. After the risk-free bet, problem gamblers were distinguished from other PGSI groups by greater attraction to micro-bets.

The research contributes to understanding how responses to sports-embedded gambling promotions vary with problem gambling severity. It can inform policy developments and future research on sports betting advertising, behaviour and associated gambling problems.

Financial support for this study was provided by the Queensland Department of Justice and Attorney General.

Keywords

Sports betting; advertising; promotions; problem gambling

Disciplines

Marketing

Comments

Attachment: PDF containing 20 slides

Included in

Marketing Commons

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Jun 9th, 8:30 AM Jun 9th, 10:00 AM

Sports Bettors’ Responses to Sports-Embedded Gambling Promotions: Comparisons Amongst PGSI Groups

The Mirage Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas, Nevada

Televised sporting events now contain a plethora of gambling and sports betting promotions, including logos, signage, advertising, sponsored segments and celebrity endorsement. This presentation focuses on how sports bettors respond to these promotions, drawing on research findings from Australia.

A first study examined sports bettors’ responses to these promotions, and whether this varied with problem gambling severity. Surveys with 544 Queensland sports bettors indicated that problem gamblers had highest approval of, felt most encouragement to gamble, and had been influenced to gamble most from these promotions, compared to non-problem and at-risk gamblers. Problem gamblers were also more influenced to bet on sports by contextual factors, particularly certain bet types and promotional appeals.

A second study used a conjoint design to measure responses to 20 simulated promotions amongst 611 regular sports bettors, non-regular sports bettors and non-sports bettors. Type of bet had more utility than type of commentator, type of message appeal and type of promotion. For type of bet, novelty risk-free bets were more enticing than micro-bets, exotic bets and traditional bets. After the risk-free bet, problem gamblers were distinguished from other PGSI groups by greater attraction to micro-bets.

The research contributes to understanding how responses to sports-embedded gambling promotions vary with problem gambling severity. It can inform policy developments and future research on sports betting advertising, behaviour and associated gambling problems.

Financial support for this study was provided by the Queensland Department of Justice and Attorney General.