Location

Greenspun College of Urban Affairs

Description

Resilience takes on many different meanings, but when we speak of the resilience of a market we are generally referencing the capability of that market’s capacity to respond, regroup and move forward, usually after an event or series of events that impede or encumber a market’s economic sustainability. The outcomes of a stable and performing market are indicated by its economic performance. Using economic indicators as a base, this study analyzes three markets as they recover from destabilizing events and attempt to respond, regroup and move forward. The study analyzes the Las Vegas, New Orleans and Detroit markets from an economic standpoint and measures the level of segregation in each of these areas. The study then explores if the segregation indices as a proxy for community continuity indicate higher economic recovery in the less segregated market.

Keywords

Capitalism; Economics; Foreclosure; Gross domestic product; Gross domestic product--Econometric models; Mortgage loans; Multiculturalism; Population; Real estate business; Recessions; Recessions--Econometric models; Segregation; Unemployed; Unemployment

Disciplines

Community-Based Research | Economics | Public Affairs, Public Policy and Public Administration | Urban Studies and Planning

Language

English

Comments

Abstract attached as additional file.

 
Apr 21st, 1:00 AM Apr 21st, 2:30 AM

Exploring The Community Factor of Economic Resiliency

Greenspun College of Urban Affairs

Resilience takes on many different meanings, but when we speak of the resilience of a market we are generally referencing the capability of that market’s capacity to respond, regroup and move forward, usually after an event or series of events that impede or encumber a market’s economic sustainability. The outcomes of a stable and performing market are indicated by its economic performance. Using economic indicators as a base, this study analyzes three markets as they recover from destabilizing events and attempt to respond, regroup and move forward. The study analyzes the Las Vegas, New Orleans and Detroit markets from an economic standpoint and measures the level of segregation in each of these areas. The study then explores if the segregation indices as a proxy for community continuity indicate higher economic recovery in the less segregated market.