Location

University of Nevada Las Vegas, Stan Fulton Building

Start Date

1-6-2007 4:50 PM

End Date

1-6-2007 5:00 PM

Description

Geography, specifically scale, has significant impacts in terms of hazards and vulnerability. Small islands, such as those found in the Pacific, experience the impacts of their relatively unique geography and scale in terms of hazards and vulnerability in at least five ways: 1) Perception and communication; 2) Impact and escape from impact; 3) Technology; 4) Recovery; and 5) Socio-environmental justice. Comparative analysis in these five areas between the Pacific’s small islands and industrialized continental regions illuminates differences regarding the way hazards and vulnerability should be conceptualized in the under-treated small islands of the world. Lessons from this analysis will aid in conceptualization of small island scenarios, as well as lend guidance to those seeking direct intervention regarding technological and natural hazards.

Keywords

Climate change; Climatic changes; Continents; Environmental degradation; Environmental hazards; Environmental impacts; Environmental quality; Natural disasters; Pacific Islands; Pacific Ocean --Islands of the Pacific; Small island environments

Disciplines

Environmental Health and Protection | Environmental Indicators and Impact Assessment | Nature and Society Relations | Physical and Environmental Geography

Language

English

Comments

9 pages
DOI: 10.1109/ISTAS.2007.4362234

 
Jun 1st, 4:50 PM Jun 1st, 5:00 PM

Session 7 - A Comparative geographic analysis of the impact of scale on hazards and vulnerability in industrialized continental lands and small pacific islands

University of Nevada Las Vegas, Stan Fulton Building

Geography, specifically scale, has significant impacts in terms of hazards and vulnerability. Small islands, such as those found in the Pacific, experience the impacts of their relatively unique geography and scale in terms of hazards and vulnerability in at least five ways: 1) Perception and communication; 2) Impact and escape from impact; 3) Technology; 4) Recovery; and 5) Socio-environmental justice. Comparative analysis in these five areas between the Pacific’s small islands and industrialized continental regions illuminates differences regarding the way hazards and vulnerability should be conceptualized in the under-treated small islands of the world. Lessons from this analysis will aid in conceptualization of small island scenarios, as well as lend guidance to those seeking direct intervention regarding technological and natural hazards.