Location

University of Nevada Las Vegas, Stan Fulton Building

Start Date

2-6-2007 11:40 AM

End Date

2-6-2007 11:50 AM

Description

Viewing usage of words in culture as key symbols, Sherry B. Ortner's indicators were applied to an analysis of the lay-public’s use of "killer bee", "Africanized Honey Bee", and "honey bee". While conducting social impact study in southern Nevada, the author noticed that informants were not associating "killer bee" with "honey bee" imagery. Interviews were conducted with residents in the community of Boulder City, Nevada focusing upon symbolic linkage between the expressions: honey bee, killer bee and Africanized Honey Bee. It was determined that people do not link these expressions together in the same symbolic domain. Ethnohistory of the human/bee relationship was presented to show how human cultures have conceptualized and prized honey bees over time. Further, this article is an examination of why separate symbolic domains are established for different categorical meanings applied to honey bees.

Keywords

Africanized honey bees; Africanized honeybee; Honeybee; Language and culture; Killer bees; Nevada – Las Vegas Valley; Sociolinguistics; Symbolic domains; Word imagery

Disciplines

Gender, Race, Sexuality, and Ethnicity in Communication | Mass Communication | Rhetoric and Composition

Language

English

Comments

11 pages
DOI: 10.1109/ISTAS.2007.4362223

 
Jun 2nd, 11:40 AM Jun 2nd, 11:50 AM

Session 11 - “Dangerous things”: A Symbolic domain for killer bees

University of Nevada Las Vegas, Stan Fulton Building

Viewing usage of words in culture as key symbols, Sherry B. Ortner's indicators were applied to an analysis of the lay-public’s use of "killer bee", "Africanized Honey Bee", and "honey bee". While conducting social impact study in southern Nevada, the author noticed that informants were not associating "killer bee" with "honey bee" imagery. Interviews were conducted with residents in the community of Boulder City, Nevada focusing upon symbolic linkage between the expressions: honey bee, killer bee and Africanized Honey Bee. It was determined that people do not link these expressions together in the same symbolic domain. Ethnohistory of the human/bee relationship was presented to show how human cultures have conceptualized and prized honey bees over time. Further, this article is an examination of why separate symbolic domains are established for different categorical meanings applied to honey bees.