Award Date

8-2011

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy in Special Education

Department

Special Education

First Committee Member

Susan Miller, Chair

Second Committee Member

Tom Pierce

Third Committee Member

Kyle Higgins

Graduate Faculty Representative

Richard Tandy

Number of Pages

219

Abstract

Many students, specifically those with learning disabilities, struggle to master foundational computation skills such as addition with regrouping. With this in mind, the purpose of this research was to examine the effects of strategy instruction that involved the use of the concrete-representational-abstract teaching sequence on the addition with regrouping computation and word problem-solving skills of students with learning disabilities. This study involved the use of a multiple probe across participants design with two replications. The participants included nine second through sixth graders who had been identified as having a learning disability and were demonstrating mathematics difficulties. There were three females (i.e., one White third grader, one Hispanic fourth grader, and one Hispanic sixth grader) and six males (i.e., two White second graders, two Hispanic third graders, one White third grader, and one Hispanic fifth grader). The participants received 20 lessons (Miller, Kaffar, & Mercer, 2011) that involved the use of strategy instruction and the concrete-representational-abstract teaching sequence to teach addition with regrouping to students with learning disabilities. The instructional method used in these lessons involved the combination of the concrete-representational-abstract sequence and the use of two mathematics strategies (i.e., RENAME and FAST RENAME). The results revealed that students with learning disabilities improved their abilities to solve addition with regrouping computation and word problems after receiving strategy instruction that involved the use of the concrete-representational-abstract teaching sequence. Additionally, most participants were able to maintain and generalize their abilities to solve addition with regrouping computation and word problems two weeks after receiving the intervention.

Keywords

Addition – Study and teaching (Elementary); Arithmetic – Study and teaching (Elementary); Concrete-representational-abstract sequence; Learning disabled children

Disciplines

Elementary Education and Teaching | Science and Mathematics Education | Special Education and Teaching

Language

English