Award Date

8-2011

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy in Psychology

Department

Psychology

First Committee Member

Christopher Kearney, Chair

Second Committee Member

Michelle Carro

Third Committee Member

Cortney Warren

Graduate Faculty Representative

Lori Olafson

Number of Pages

195

Abstract

Failure to attend school can have a devastating impact on a child’s social, emotional, academic, and later career development. Psychologists, educators, and researchers from other disciplines have produced large bodies of literature regarding problematic absenteeism. This has led to varying terminology, divergent approaches, assessment, and treatment of nonattendance. Additional research on contextual, proximal, and distal variables, such as culture and family, has been encouraged. The present study involved contextual variables related to school refusal behavior and contained a more representative sample of youth with attendance difficulties than previous studies. Contextual variables included youth and parent ethnic identity, family environment, school climate, and perceptions of daily discrimination. The present study also examined differences between referral sources (community and clinic) on ethnic identity, psychopathology, and functions of school refusal behavior. Results are discussed in respect to systemic levels (i.e., youth, parent, family, peers, school, and community) and implications for assessment, treatment, and/or prevention practices.

Keywords

Absenteeism; Nonattendence; School attendance; School attendance – Psychological aspects; School phobia; School refusal behavior

Disciplines

Child Psychology | Clinical Psychology | School Psychology

Language

English


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