Award Date

2009

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts in Anthropology

Department

Anthropology and Ethnic Studies

Advisor 1

Barbara Roth, Committee Chair

First Committee Member

Karen Harry

Second Committee Member

Paul Buck

Graduate Faculty Representative

Stephen Rowland

Number of Pages

178

Abstract

This thesis examines flaked stone tools that were used by the Virgin Anasazi and the debitage resulting from their manufacture at six sites in the Mt. Trumbull region in order to infer past human behavior. The behaviors being examined include activities carried out at sites, the processing and use of raw stone materials, and patterns of regional exchange. I have applied obsidian sourcing technology and an analysis of flaked stone attributes. The research indicates a range of activities occurred at habitation sites at Mt. Trumbull, and toolmakers did not need to expend large amounts of time and energy on acquiring their lithic resources. Obsidian, although rare, was not so difficult to obtain or especially valued that it was highly conserved. The inhabitants of Mt. Trumbull obtained their obsidian through a dynamic system of interaction, but from different groups than those from which they acquired pottery, shell, and turquoise.

Keywords

Anasazi; Chert; Flakes; Lithics; Mt. Trumbull; Arizona; Obsidian; Southwest; Stone tools; Virgin Anasazi sites

Disciplines

Archaeological Anthropology

Language

English


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