Award Date

12-2011

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Journalism and Media Studies

First Committee Member

Paul Traudt, Chair

Second Committee Member

Julian Kilker

Third Committee Member

Stephen Bates

Graduate Faculty Representative

Barbara Brents

Number of Pages

79

Abstract

Pornography remains a highly discussed and hotly debated topic within the academy and popular culture. Despite declining revenues for pornographic content, the proliferation of the Internet makes pornography easier to access than ever before. This study examines aggression and consent in popular pornography on the Internet. One hundred scenes across five highly trafficked Web sites’ “most viewed” sections were selected for analysis. Consistent with existing research literature, women were overwhelmingly the targets of aggressive acts and typically expressed consensual reactions to acts of aggression. The results are examined within the context of social learning theory to posit what ideas and lessons audiences may be learning from pornographic content on the Internet.

Keywords

Aggression; Aggressiveness; Communication and the arts; Consent; Content analysis; Internet pornography – Social aspects; Pornography; Sex; Sexual consent; Sexuality; Social learning; Social learning theory; Social sciences

Disciplines

Community-Based Research | Gender and Sexuality | Social Control, Law, Crime, and Deviance | Social Psychology and Interaction

Language

English