Award Date

12-2011

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts in Journalism and Media Studies

Department

Journalism and Media Studies

First Committee Member

Daniel Stout, Chair

Second Committee Member

Lawrence Mullen

Third Committee Member

Stephen Bates

Graduate Faculty Representative

Tara Emmers-Sommer

Number of Pages

100

Abstract

This research contains a comparative and critical analysis of both civic and traditional journalism and the practices associated with the two models. In depth interviews were conducted with a total of nine respondents to explore their perspectives on the topic. Purposive sampling was employed to ensure the sample consisted solely of journalists and former journalists. From the data emerged five primary themes: Objectivity, Journalists as Problem Solvers, Confusion with the Term Civic Journalism, Journalists' Encouragement of Political Discourse and Deliberation, and Dedication to Traditional Journalism. Respondents overwhelmingly supported the notion of traditional journalism as the dominant model. There was support for some practices utilized by the civic journalism model, however, the values endemic to traditional journalism, remaining objective and detached, appeared to be a professional priority for the majority of the sample.

Keywords

Activism; Advocacy; Communication and the arts; Detachment; Journalism — Objectivity; Journalism — Political aspects; Public journalism

Disciplines

Communication | Community-Based Research | Journalism Studies

Language

English


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