Award Date

5-2013

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT)

Department

Physical Therapy

First Committee Member

Robbin Hickman, Research Project Coordinator

Second Committee Member

Merrill Landers

Number of Pages

50

Abstract

Background and purpose: People diagnosed with a Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) usually have physical, cognitive, emotional, and sleep deficits. Sensory overload is a common symptom of TBI. One treatment prescribed for sensory overload is over the counter ear filters. Ear filters have shown to decrease sensory input. Could the ear filters have an effect on balance and dizziness without much cost to the patient or the clinic?

Subjects: Patients diagnosed with a mild or moderate brain injury, ages of 18-65 years old. They needed to be medically stable, potential to walk, and have complaints of dizziness and/or balance problems.

Methods: The Bohannon Timed Stance Battery, Berg Balance Scale and the Dynamic Gait Index are measured and Activities Specific Confidence Scale, Dizziness Handicap Inventory, the Vestibular Disorders Activities of Daily Living Scale and Fear of Falling Avoidance-Behavior Questionnaire are given. Over the counter ear filters are prescribed for use during vestibular rehabilitation either during the initial evaluation or one week later.

Results: Not enough subjects to perform an appropriate mixed factorial analysis; however, they do give an indicator of the probable effect sizes to power a future study.

Discussion/Conclusion: The results did not demonstrate a difference with the use of ear filters because of inconclusive data. Not enough time between immediate and delayed use of ear filters was seen for a favorable conclusion of usage.

Keywords

Brain – Wounds and injuries; Dizziness; Ear – Protection; Equilibrium (Physiology); Sensory disorders; Sensory stimulation; Traumatic Brain Injury; Vestibular rehabilitation

Disciplines

Neurosciences | Physical Therapy | Rehabilitation and Therapy

Language

English


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