Award Date

5-1-2012

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Educational Psychology

First Committee Member

Gregory J. Schraw

Second Committee Member

Eunsook Hong

Third Committee Member

Gwen C. Marchand

Fourth Committee Member

Janelle M. Bailey

Number of Pages

196

Abstract

The present study employs the Nelson and Narens Model of Metacognition (NNMM) to examine the influence of metacognitive strategy training and extrinsic incentives on performance, level of confidence, and the calibration accuracy of undergraduate students' metacognitive judgments within a pretest/posttest experimental design. Calibration of performance is crucial because it allows learners to engage in appropriate comprehension monitoring during a learning episode. As metacognition implies, those individuals who are better calibrators can more adequately adapt to the demands of the situation (monitoring), and thereby better prepare for learning episodes that are similar in format or content (control). Consequently, this aids in the improvement of performance, confidence, and calibration accuracy.

Findings suggest that strategy training and incentives enhanced performance and level confidence in performance. However, only strategy training increased the calibration accuracy of feeling-of-knowing judgments. Theoretically, both strategy training and incentives influence learners' metacognitive monitoring and control; therefore, the results support the NNMM. Educational implications and directions for future research are discussed.

Keywords

Calibration; Education; Learning; Metacognition; Metacognitive Monitoring; Motivation; Self-Regulated Learning

Disciplines

Educational Psychology

Language

English


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