Award Date

5-1-2013

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Kinesiology and Nutrition Sciences

First Committee Member

Janet S. Dufek

Second Committee Member

John A. Mercer

Third Committee Member

Richard Tandy

Fourth Committee Member

Robbin Hickman

Number of Pages

58

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of shoe outsole design on maximum vertical acceleration and select kinematic parameters during level and uphill walking across phases of stance. Twelve participants, 7 males (75.1±9.3 kg, 173.6±3.6 cm, 22.9±3.5 yrs) and 5 females (56.5±5.1 kg, 158.3±4.5 cm, 25.4±11.1 yrs) granted written consent and preferred walking speed was determined. An accelerometer (480 Hz) was attached to the distal leg to measure maximum leg acceleration (Aleg) and an electrogoniometer (480 Hz) was placed on the back to measure sagittal lumbar motion (LumbarROM). Sagittal video capture (60 Hz) included thigh range of motion (ThighROM), knee range of motion (KneeROM) and ankle range of motion (AnkleROM). Participants walked on a treadmill in each of four randomized conditions: 1) Rounded outsole shoe (ROS) at 0% incline, 2) Traditional outsole shoe (TOS) at 0% incline, 3) ROS at 5% incline and 4) TOS at 5% incline. Participants walked at 10% greater than preferred pace. Data were obtained from five consecutive gait cycles. For each gait cycle, stance was normalized to 100%. Stance phase was further divided into Phase I, II, and III. Data analysis included a 2 (shoe) x 2 (incline) repeated measure ANOVA (α=0.05) for ALEG, LumbarROM, ThighROM, KneeROM, and AnkleROM at each phase of stance (Phase I, II, and III). Post hoc paired t-Tests were performed for significant interaction. Results show seven of the fifteen dependent variables for shoe differed significantly (p

Keywords

Gait in humans; Human locomotion; Incline; Kinematics; Leg acceleration; Legs – Mechanical properties; Rockerbottom shoe; Shoe outsole; Shoes; Walking; Walking biomechanics

Disciplines

Biomechanics | Kinesiology

Language

English


Included in

Biomechanics Commons

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