Award Date

8-1-2013

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

First Committee Member

Jennifer Rennels

Second Committee Member

Erin Hannon

Third Committee Member

Murray Millar

Fourth Committee Member

Sheniz Moonie

Number of Pages

81

Abstract

The process of expressing what is masculine promotes attitudes and behaviors that can discourage men from seeking help, contributing to numerous health issues in males. The purpose of this study was to explore how personally endorsed gender stereotypes vs. gender stereotyped attitudes impacted help-seeking behavior. In the current study, female and male adults completed challenging puzzle tasks, recalled previous health help-seeking behavior, and completed sex-typed measures. Females utilized personally endorsed gender stereotypes more during the puzzle tasks, while males utilized both personally endorsed gender stereotypes as well as gender stereotyped attitudes. When males recalled health-related events, however, personally endorsed feminine stereotypes predicted previous instances of help-seeking, suggesting a possible difference in the utilization of pathways during recalled vs. observable help-seeking behaviors. Findings demonstrated that personal and attitudinal pathways of gender stereotypes play distinct roles for males and females in predicting help-seeking behavior.

Keywords

Gender; Gender identity; Health; Help-seeking; Help-seeking behavior; Masculinity; Sex (Psychology); Sex-Typing; Stereotypes (Social psychology)

Disciplines

Gender and Sexuality | Health Psychology | Psychology | Social Psychology

Language

English


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