Award Date

8-1-2014

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Journalism and Media Studies

First Committee Member

Paul Traudt

Second Committee Member

Gregory Borchard

Third Committee Member

Julian Kilker

Fourth Committee Member

Robert Futrell

Number of Pages

90

Abstract

Understanding the influences underlying consumption has become an increasingly important goal for marketers. This study examined the role of self-concept in consumer behavior, specifically product evaluation. The influences of various dimensions of the self-concept are examined in regard to four product dimensions: public luxury, public necessity, private luxury, and private necessity. Differences due to variations in individual levels of self-monitoring are also measured. Overall, results showed that the more conspicuous a product is (higher on luxury/public dimensions) the greater the relationship between evaluation and ideal self-images (ideal self and ideal social self) for both high and low self-monitors.

Keywords

Consumer behavior; Consumption (Economics); Luxuries; Luxuries/necessities; Public/private consumption; Self-concept; Self-image congruency; Self-monitoring; Self-perception

Disciplines

Marketing | Social Psychology and Interaction | Sociology | Work, Economy and Organizations

Language

English


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