Award Date

5-1-2015

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

English

First Committee Member

Donald Revell

Second Committee Member

John C. Unrue

Third Committee Member

Stephen Brown

Fourth Committee Member

Margaret Harp

Number of Pages

89

Abstract

The following thesis analyzes the problematic nature of J.D. Salinger’s principal Glass family stories (“A Perfect Day for Bananafish,” “Franny,” “Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters,” “Zooey,” “Seymour: an Introduction,” and “Hapworth 16, 1924”) primarily by means of examining errors in narrative structure, complications in constructing a clearly defined sense of spirituality, and a lack of a functional organization between stories. I argue that although these components of Salinger’s Glass family stories ultimately prove to be problematic and account for inconsistencies within the overarching narrative, they are a product of experimentation with form and, as such, should be viewed positively as necessary processes in expanding and traversing standard literary paradigms.

Keywords

American literature; Glass family; Literary form; Salinger, J. D. (Jerome David), 1919-2010

Disciplines

American Literature | Arts and Humanities

Language

English


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