Award Date

12-1-2015

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Environmental and Public Affairs

First Committee Member

Cecilia Maldonado

Second Committee Member

Monica Lounsbery

Third Committee Member

Sterling Saddler

Fourth Committee Member

LeAnn Putney

Number of Pages

195

Abstract

African-American male student-athletes who played a revenue-generating sport enter the labor market having relatively poor social networks, low grade point averages, few marketable skills outside of sports, restricted work experiences, and marginal subject matter knowledge; most of which are the result of their participation in sports (Singer, 2008). Therefore making the transition more difficult than even the average African-American male (Edwards, 1980). The purpose of this study was to: (1) Determine the factors that predict subjective career success for former D-I African-American male athletes who played a revenue-generating sport, and (2) Explore how former D-I African-American male athletes, who played a revenue-generating sport and realized subjective career success managed the transition from sport to the general labor market. This convergent parallel mixed-method study used survey research as well as semi- structured interviews to explore what factors contribute to the realization of subjective career success for former African-American male athletes. Stepwise linear regression was used to explore the relationship between the indevependent variables and the single dependent variable, subjective career success. The analysis showed that the only variable to produce a statistically significant outcome was adaptive capacity (full scale) (R=.386). The themes generated from the interviews with eight subjectively successful former athletes confirmed the quantitative results.

Keywords

Adaptive Capacity; African-American Male; Agility; Resilience; Subjective Career Success; Workforce Development

Disciplines

African American Studies | American Studies | Educational Leadership | Labor Economics | Race and Ethnicity

Language

English