Award Date

12-2000

Degree Type

Capstone

Degree Name

Master of Public Administration (MPA)

Department

Public Administration

Number of Pages

49

Abstract

Small groups have formed to resolve social issues since the beginning of time. It is the village concept where activists meet in the center of town to discuss a concern and together work toward a solution to a problem. This is represented in the town of Plato’s Republic and how they handled its dilemma with Socrates disrespect and disruptions to their way of ruling/ their culture. People met at a central location, discussed the issue, agreed on a solution and, together, enforced the resolution. Thus, first governments used groups to find solutions to community problems (Bell and Smith, p.1). Citizens coalescing to discuss, plan, and implement change to better their condition and their community has always been one of the most prevalent ways Americans have resolved issues. Building coalitions within one’s community enables concerned individuals who “can’t do everything” to work collectively to positively affect the lives of youth and their family (Archer, Cripe, and McCaslin, p. 1). Forming coalitions have potential outcomes that can improve the quality of life, public safety, economy, citizen well being, and government capacity to be effective, accountable, and supportive of group efforts (National Crime Prevention Council, p.1). In essence, group activity is more effective and efficient by combining monetary and human resources to reach a common goal.

Keywords

Coalitions; Communities; Political participation

Disciplines

Civic and Community Engagement | Public Administration

Language

English


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