Award Date

2009

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts in Psychology

Department

Psychology

Advisor 1

Cortney Warren, Committee Chair

First Committee Member

Marta Meana

Second Committee Member

Jennifer Rennels

Graduate Faculty Representative

Lori Olafson

Number of Pages

162

Abstract

Parenting skills classes are an effective means of preventing and remediating juvenile delinquency, youth violence, and child maltreatment. In particular, juvenile delinquency and child maltreatment disproportionately affect low-income African American families. Unfortunately, data from most parenting classes suggest dismal attendance and participation rates for racial- and ethnic-minorities from low-income backgrounds. The lack of effective recruitment may be due, in part, to the level of cultural competency inherent in the design, content, and implementation of existing parenting classes. Using semi-structured interviews and the qualitative methodology of grounded theory, this study explored the self-reported parenting beliefs, values, and struggles of a sample of low-income African American mothers whose children are at high risk for juvenile delinquency, youth violence, and child maltreatment and explicated a theory that connects such beliefs to parenting skills classes. These data may be useful in guiding parenting program design to increase the relevancy and effectiveness of parenting skills classes for this population.

Keywords

African-Americans; Child abuse prevention; Juvenile delinquency prevention; Low income families; Parenting programs; Parenting beliefs; Parenting skills classes; Recruitment; Retention; Theory

Disciplines

Family, Life Course, and Society | Social Psychology

Language

English


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