Award Date

2003

Degree Type

Thesis

Department

Nursing

Number of Pages

37

Abstract

In today's healthcare climate, retaining staff nurses is desirable and may be a more permanent solution to improve the nursing shortage. Employing a leadership style that is conducive to staff nurse job satisfaction may be needed to achieve that goal. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship of the unit manager leadership style with job satisfaction and intent to stay in the intensive care setting. Staff nurses in two Las Vegas hospitals, one private and one public, were surveyed. A questionnaire was developed and voluntarily completed by 125 registered nurses employed in adult and pediatric intensive care units. Analysis of the data was made using Pearson correlations to determine the relationship between the dependent variables of job satisfaction and intent to stay and multiple independent variables. Regression analysis was then completed to find the measures that impacted the job satisfaction and intent to stay the greatest. The findings suggested that job satisfaction and intent to stay in a position were not affected by nurse manager leadership style in this population. The nurse's instead seemed to strive for more of their basic needs, which was found to be a factor in both job satisfaction and retention and suggests further research.

Keywords

Employee retention; Intensive care nursing; Nurse administrators; Nurses — Job satisfaction; Nurses – Recruiting

Disciplines

Health and Medical Administration | Nursing | Other Nursing

Language

English

Comments

Incomplete paper data


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