Award Date

8-2010

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts in Political Science

Department

Political Science

First Committee Member

Michele Kuenzi, Chair

Second Committee Member

John P. Tuman

Third Committee Member

Tiffiany Howard

Graduate Faculty Representative

Melvin Jameson

Number of Pages

103

Abstract

Foreign aid has become a growing importance of U.S. foreign policy in the last few years. As the U.S. is committing more aid towards the developing world, questions over the purpose of this expansion of aid have emerged. While the traditional perspectives on the purpose of foreign aid of either serving the strategic interests of the donor or the development interest of the recipients are given as potential reasoning behind this allocation of aid, the impact of the U.S.’s involvement in the War on Terror may have more of a significant impact on the U.S.’s current foreign aid allocation. Foreign aid allocated to Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) may have felt the greatest impact from the War on Terror, as the region has now been recognized for its geostrategic importance to the U.S. due to its high risk of instability and state failure. Looking at the potential determinants of U.S. foreign aid before and after the start of the War on Terror, this study asks whether this new security environment has had any profound effect on U.S. aid allocation to SSA. A multivariate panel regression with a partial fixed effects model is employed to identify the determinants of U.S. aid during these time periods. Differences in aid allocation that have been found between these two time periods suggest that the War on Terror has had a significant, yet limited, effect on U.S. foreign aid SSA.

Keywords

Africa; Sub-Saharan; Allocation; Economic assistance; Failed states; Foreign aid; Partial fixed effects; State failure; Sub-Saharan Africa; War on terror; Terrorism — Prevention — Federal aid; War on Terrorism; 2001-2009

Disciplines

International Relations | Political Science

Language

English


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