Award Date

8-2010

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts in History

Department

History

First Committee Member

Todd E. Robinson, Chair

Second Committee Member

Greg Hise

Third Committee Member

Eugene P. Moehring

Graduate Faculty Representative

Christie D. Batson

Number of Pages

110

Abstract

Multiform segregation in the context of the urban crises was a complex socio-historical phenomenon. The primary focus of this study addresses racial segregation in at least three basic societal areas: housing, employment, and education. Through the spatial separation of multiple ethnoracial groups such as African Americans and Mexican Americans, multiform segregation precipitated the urban crises. In the 50-year period this study covers, Las Vegas and Los Angeles sustained a two-tiered class system according to the prevailing racial attitudes of each city's business elite. As a resort city, Las Vegas could not endure ethnoracial tensions while Los Angeles' industrial base provided the city with the socio-political capital necessary to withstand rioting. Research materials include oral interviews, newspaper articles, governmental reports, and scholarly manuscripts. The main conclusion of this study reveals that multiform segregation was a citywide process marked by crises such as housing shortages, labor disturbances, race riots, and underperforming schools.

Keywords

Blacks — Segregation; California – Los Angeles; Discrimination in education; Discrimination in employment; Mexican Americans — Segregation; Nevada – Las Vegas; Slums

Disciplines

African American Studies | History | Social History | United States History

Language

English


Share

COinS