Award Date

8-2010

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy in Teacher Education

Department

Curriculum & Instruction

First Committee Member

Cari Klecka, Chair

Second Committee Member

Sandra Odell

Third Committee Member

Janelle Bailey

Graduate Faculty Representative

LeAnn Putney

Number of Pages

274

Abstract

This mixed-method, dual-phase, embedded-case study employed the Social Cognitive Theory and the construct of self-efficacy to examine the contributors to science teaching self-efficacy and science teaching practices across different levels of efficacy in six pre-service elementary teachers during their science methods course and student teaching experiences. Data sources included the Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument (STEBI-B) for pre-service teachers, questionnaires, journals, reflections, student teaching lesson observations, and lesson debriefing notes. Results from the STEBI-B show that all participants measured an increase in efficacy throughout the study. The ANOVA analysis of the STEBI-B revealed a statistically significant increase in level of efficacy during methods course, student teaching, and from the beginning of the study to the end. Of interest in this study was the examination of the participants' science teaching practices across different levels of efficacy. Results of this analysis revealed how the pre-service elementary teachers in this study contextualized their experiences in learning to teach science and its influences on their science teaching practices. Key implications involves the value in exploring how pre-service teachers interpret their learning to teach experiences and how their interpretations influence the development of their science teaching practices.

Keywords

Elementary teachers; Pre-service; Science – Study and teaching; Self-efficacy; Student teachers

Disciplines

Teacher Education and Professional Development

Language

English


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