Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1988

Publication Title

Lake and Reservoir Management

Publisher

North American Lake Management Society

Volume

4

First page number:

135

Last page number:

142

Abstract

Las Vegas Wash, a natural wash east of Las Vegas, Nevada, carries stormwater, groundwater drainage, and sewage effluent from two sewage treatment plants to Lake Mead. Over 80 percent of the normal discharge of approximately 3.4 m3/s (120 ft3/s) consists of effluent from the City of Las Vegas and Clark County sewage treatment plants. Beginning in the 1950s, a large wetland area developed along the wash that supported waterfowl populations and contributed to some water quality transformations. Heavy rains and subsequent flooding in the area in 1983 and 1984 resulted in erosion and channelization that greatly reduced the wetland area within Las Vegas Wash. The reduction in wetland area shortened water travel time in the wash and affected water quality. The primary impacts on the water entering Lake Mead have been an increase in temperature, a decrease in dissolved oxygen concentration, and an increase in ammonia levels. Other physical-chemical parameters and changes in nutrient transformations are also discussed.

Keywords

Ammonia; Dissolved oxygen; Environmental monitoring; Lake Mead (Ariz. and Nev.); Las Vegas Wash (Nev.); Sedimentation and deposition; Water contamination; Water quality; Watersheds

Disciplines

Biochemistry | Biology | Desert Ecology | Environmental Health and Protection | Environmental Indicators and Impact Assessment | Environmental Monitoring | Fresh Water Studies | Natural Resources and Conservation | Sustainability | Water Resource Management

Language

English