Funder

Center for Academic Enrichment and Outreach

Document Type

Poster

Publication Date

9-20-2018

Publisher

University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Center for Academic Enrichment and Outreach

Publisher Location

Las Vegas, NV

Abstract

Increasingly, infants in the post-industrialized west are being diagnosed with conditions such as plagiocephaly or torticollis – which are postural deformities that can be corrected with positioning behavior. While a handful of studies have cursorily explored infant carrying practices, here I provide the first comprehensive cross-cultural literature review that aims to make connections between infant transport style and the timing of infant development in the emergence of sitting, crawling, and walking .Such a synthesis is important, not only in terms of contributing to cross-cultural research, but also for parents in the cultural west to aid in the better understanding of how infant transport and securing devices used in post-industrial cultures (e.g. swings, strollers, car seats) can not only exacerbate postural deformities, but also how altering infant resting or sleeping positions can mitigate some of the symptoms of such conditions.

Keywords

Cross cultural; Infant; Sling; Carrying; Posture; Development, milestone; Walking; Pre-walking; Parenting; Restraint; Torticollis; Plagiocephaly; Precocious; Motor delays

Disciplines

Biological and Physical Anthropology | Social and Cultural Anthropology

File Format

PDF

File Size

573

Language

English

Permissions

Creative Commons

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.


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