Title

Marginalized by Choice—Kayenta Pueblo Communities in the Southwest (AD 800–1500)

Document Type

Book Section

Publication Date

2-18-2019

Publication Title

Bioarchaeology of Marginilized People

Publisher

Elsevier Science & Technology

Publisher Location

New York, NY

First page number:

115

Last page number:

132

Abstract

Remote and environmentally marginal, the Kayenta region in northeastern Arizona was originally referred to as a provincial backwater when compared to the more architecturally grand ceremonial and political centers that surrounded it. Archeologists suggest that Kayenta was marginalized from these centers because they do not show any of the trappings of exotic trade items, social stratification, or cultural innovations. However, those features that distinguish Kayenta from their contemporaries in other regions may have saved them from nutritional and bacterial diseases, trauma, and warfare. The bioarchaeological data show a generally robust, high-fertility population that was well-adapted and long-lived in the region. By intentionally embracing their marginalized status and inward-focused (but not insular) identity, they were healthier and free from warfare unlike their neighbors.

Keywords

Ancestral pueblo; Diet; Flexibility; Health; Kayenta

Disciplines

Social and Cultural Anthropology

Language

English

UNLV article access

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