Title

Use of Active Video Gaming in Children with Neuromotor Dysfunction: A Systematic Review

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-1-2017

Publication Title

Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology

Publisher

Blackwell Publishing Ltd

Volume

59

Issue

9

First page number:

903

Last page number:

911

Abstract

Aim: To examine current evidence on use of active video gaming (AVG) to improve motor function in children with movement disorders including cerebral palsy, developmental coordination disorder, and Down syndrome. Method: Scopus, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and CINAHL were searched. Included papers studied the use of AVG for improving movement-related outcomes in these populations. Parameters studied included health condition, strength of evidence, AVG delivery methods, capacity for individualizing play, outcomes addressed, effectiveness for achieving outcomes, and challenges/limitations. Results: The 20 extracted articles varied in quality. Studies involved children with six different conditions using AVG in clinical, home, or school settings for 49 different motor outcomes. Dosage varied in frequency and duration. Choice of games played and difficulty level were therapist determined (n=6) or child controlled (n=14). The most common study limitations were small sample sizes and difficulty individualizing treatment. All articles showed improvement in outcomes with AVG, although differences were not consistently significant compared with conventional therapy. Interpretation: Heterogeneity of measurement tools and target outcomes prevented meta-analysis or development of formal recommendations. However, AVG is feasible and shows potential for improving outcomes in this population. Additional investigations of dosing variables, utility as a home supplement to clinical care, and outcomes with larger sample sizes are merited. © 2017 Mac Keith Press

Language

english

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