Title

Processes Involving Perceived Instructional Support, Task Value, and Engagement in Graduate Education

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-1-2017

Publication Title

Journal of Experimental Education

Volume

85

Issue

1

First page number:

87

Last page number:

106

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relations among perceived instructional support (provision of relevance and involvement), subjective task value beliefs (utility, attainment, and intrinsic value), and engagement (behavioral and emotional) over the course of a semester for graduate students enrolled in an introductory research methods course in a college of education (N = 217). Structural equation modeling (SEM) results suggested that each source of perceived support exerted unique influence on students' beliefs about utility value, intrinsic value, and attainment value of their research methods coursework. In turn, midsemester value beliefs predicted semester-end student reports of behavioral and cognitive engagement. Direct and indirect effects between perceived provisions of support and engagement were inconsistent. This study supports the notion that different patterns of predictors and outcomes may occur for different aspects of value beliefs and that multiple sources of instructional support are important for supporting student motivation for adult learners. © 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Language

english

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