Title

Disaggregated Hispanic Groups and Cancer: Importance, Methodology, and Current Knowledge

Document Type

Book Section

Publication Date

12-13-2019

Publication Title

Advancing the Science of Cancer in Latinos

Publisher

Springer

Edition

1

First page number:

17

Last page number:

34

Abstract

Cancer is the leading cause of death among Latinos/Hispanics, the largest racial/ethnic minority group in the United States. Their cancer burden has nearly doubled in 15 years, with 129,000 new cancer cases nationwide in 2014. As this relatively young Hispanic population ages, this burden will inevitably increase; thus, accurate characterization of the Hispanic cancer experience is critical. In this chapter, we summarize the current knowledge on cancer in Hispanics, with a focus on the imperative of disaggregating by specific Hispanic group (Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, Central Americans, South Americans, and Dominicans) and nativity. We also describe for the first time some major methodological challenges in determining accurate cancer indicators for specific Hispanic groups and suggest approaches to overcome these hurdles. Our research shows that cancer patterns by specific Hispanic group can be quite distinct according to country of origin, particularly among the first-generation immigrants. For the second-generation Latinos and beyond, patterns for obesity-related cancers, poverty-related cancers, and particularly liver cancer are intriguing, and often parallel patterns are seen among other disadvantaged US minority groups. Unsurprisingly, birthplace (US- vs. foreign-born) used as a proxy measure of acculturation is a strong confounder in epidemiological analyses, dramatically influencing cancer indicators. Disaggregation of Hispanic groups should frame efforts to formulate cancer prevention and control strategies to address the needs of the burgeoning US Latino population.

Keywords

Disaggregated Hispanic; Cancer; Survival; Birthplace; Incidence; Mortality

Disciplines

Arts and Humanities | Latina/o Studies | Medical Specialties | Medicine and Health Sciences | Oncology | Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies

Language

English

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