Location

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Start Date

16-4-2011 11:10 AM

End Date

16-4-2011 11:30 AM

Description

When and how galaxies formed throughout the history of the Universe is one of the most fundamental questions of astronomy and astrophysics. As technology improves, astronomers are able to push the frontier of galaxy observation to a period when the Universe was less than 1 billion years old. This is when the first galaxies are beginning to form. However, beyond the limits of observational technology lies data fundamental to our complete understanding of these processes. Using state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamic computer codes combined with access to the nation’s largest and fastest supercomputers, we are able to simulate the formation and evolution of galaxies self-consistently from very early time to the present time, and explore the same physical and photometric properties of early galaxies. Using simulated universe in the computer, we make predictions of what lies beyond current observational limits, and make predictions for the next generation of space telescopes

Keywords

Galaxies – Formation

Disciplines

Applied Mathematics | Astrophysics and Astronomy | Cosmology, Relativity, and Gravity | External Galaxies | Stars, Interstellar Medium and the Galaxy

Language

English

Comments

Collaborators: Jun-Hwan Choi, University of Kentucky; Kentaro Nagamine, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Consists of 13 PowerPoint slides

Attached file: Poster

JJaacks_FOCSPoster_2011.pdf (3494 kB)
Properties of z≥6 Galaxies in Cosmological SPH Simulations

 
Apr 16th, 11:10 AM Apr 16th, 11:30 AM

Oral presentation: The universe in a box

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

When and how galaxies formed throughout the history of the Universe is one of the most fundamental questions of astronomy and astrophysics. As technology improves, astronomers are able to push the frontier of galaxy observation to a period when the Universe was less than 1 billion years old. This is when the first galaxies are beginning to form. However, beyond the limits of observational technology lies data fundamental to our complete understanding of these processes. Using state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamic computer codes combined with access to the nation’s largest and fastest supercomputers, we are able to simulate the formation and evolution of galaxies self-consistently from very early time to the present time, and explore the same physical and photometric properties of early galaxies. Using simulated universe in the computer, we make predictions of what lies beyond current observational limits, and make predictions for the next generation of space telescopes