Location

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Start Date

16-4-2011 2:00 PM

End Date

16-4-2011 3:30 PM

Description

AIDS denialism is a growing issue in many parts the world. Through scholarly journal articles, book resources and other research tactics, further understanding how HIV/AIDS denialism is unethical can be distinguished. Discovering that AIDS is most prominent in South Africa explains why denialism is as critical as it is. However, the unethical aspect of AIDS denialism is in effect particularly amongst families. When a South African inhabitant realizes they have AIDS, they feel outcasted by their families due to shame. They fear as though they will be disowned because they have flaws that are unacceptable. These family values are significant because those who diagnosed or affected would rather be unaware of the disease to maintain social acceptance . However, the difference of ethics in society affects how AIDS denialism is perceived. In the United States, being unaware of AIDS diagnosis is considered a social faux pas. Thanks to advertisements, educational classes and overall social awareness, being conscience is implied to be important because of society’s openness with sexuality. As for South Africa’s social standards, lack of resources, poor government and unawareness impact the ethical value of AIDS because they have not been taught otherwise concerning the actual disease. Their knowledge about HIV/AIDS is limited; therefore they lack the understanding of the risks of the disease.

Keywords

AIDS (Disease); AIDS phobia; Denial (Psychology); Families; South Africa

Disciplines

Bioethics and Medical Ethics | Disease Modeling | Health Policy | Immune System Diseases | Public Health | Public Health Education and Promotion | Sociology | Virus Diseases

Language

English

 
Apr 16th, 2:00 PM Apr 16th, 3:30 PM

AIDS denialism

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

AIDS denialism is a growing issue in many parts the world. Through scholarly journal articles, book resources and other research tactics, further understanding how HIV/AIDS denialism is unethical can be distinguished. Discovering that AIDS is most prominent in South Africa explains why denialism is as critical as it is. However, the unethical aspect of AIDS denialism is in effect particularly amongst families. When a South African inhabitant realizes they have AIDS, they feel outcasted by their families due to shame. They fear as though they will be disowned because they have flaws that are unacceptable. These family values are significant because those who diagnosed or affected would rather be unaware of the disease to maintain social acceptance . However, the difference of ethics in society affects how AIDS denialism is perceived. In the United States, being unaware of AIDS diagnosis is considered a social faux pas. Thanks to advertisements, educational classes and overall social awareness, being conscience is implied to be important because of society’s openness with sexuality. As for South Africa’s social standards, lack of resources, poor government and unawareness impact the ethical value of AIDS because they have not been taught otherwise concerning the actual disease. Their knowledge about HIV/AIDS is limited; therefore they lack the understanding of the risks of the disease.