Submission Type

Presentation

Submission Title

Development and validation of a psychometric instrument to measure recovery in gambling disorder

Session Title

Session 1-4-A: Methods in Problem Gambling Research

Location

Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada

Start Date

28-5-2019 3:30 PM

End Date

28-5-2019 4:55 PM

Disciplines

Clinical Psychology | Quantitative Psychology

Abstract

Abstract:

The concept of recovery is poorly and inconsistently defined in the gambling field. This is evidenced by an array of different outcomes used to measure treatment effectiveness. As there are no established operational criteria for recovery, it is difficult to compare between studies and determine relative treatment effectiveness. The literature would benefit from a more unified approach to the measurement of recovery. The aim of the current research was to develop and validate a psychometric instrument designed to assess the multiple dimensions of recovery in gambling disorder. The methods used were aligned with best-practice scale development processes. A series of qualitative interviews were conducted with gamblers accessing formal help services to better understand their conceptualisations of recovery. Findings were compared and contrasted with existing treatment literature to form an integrated construct definition. Based on this definition, an initial pool of questionnaire items was developed and then subjected to review and refinement via expert feedback and cognitive pretesting. The final step involved an empirical evaluation of the recovery instrument in a larger sample of gambling treatment service users to analyse reliability, validity, and factor structure. A reliable and valid instrument for recovery will help facilitate higher reporting standards among gambling researchers and clinicians.

Implication statement:

Recovery is a core focus of contemporary mental health service policy internationally. Given demand for evidence-based practices, reliable and valid data is needed to support recovery goals. A psychometrically sound instrument to measure recovery in gambling disorder would enable cross-study comparisons and move the field closer toward establishing best-practice treatment protocols.


Keywords

Gambling Disorder, Recovery, Treatment outcomes, Psychometric measurement, Consumer perspectives

Author Bio

Dylan Pickering received his BA Psychology Honours in 2013 and was awarded the Australian Psychological Society Prize for gaining first place in his cohort. Since graduating, Dylan has worked as a researcher at the Gambling Treatment and Research Clinic directed by Professor Alex Blaszczynski. He is currently completing a PhD at the University of Sydney investigating approaches to measuring recovery in gambling disorders.

Alex Blaszczynski is a professor at University of Sydney and the Director, Gambling Treatment and Research Clinic (GTRC). He is a clinical researcher and psychologist with a long history of involvement in treatment and related studies on gambling disorders, the psychology of gambling, and principles and policies related to responsible gambling. He developed a conceptual pathways model explaining the aetiology of pathological gamblers. He is the Editor-in-Chief of International Gambling Studies.

Sally M. Gainsbury is the deputy director of the University of Sydney Gambling Treatment and Research Clinic. She has expertise in the design and evaluation of responsible gambling policies and strategies and understanding the use and impact of new technology on gambling, including online gambling, social gaming and social media.

Funding Sources

This study was funded, in part, by a deed of gift from ClubsNSW. The investigators conducted the research with no input from ClubsNSW in the design or methodology of the study. ClubsNSW imposed no constraints on publishing the results of the research. This work was supported by an Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Research Award [DE1060100459] awarded to Dr. Sally Gainsbury. A portion of the fieldwork expenses were funded by a Postgraduate Research Grant awarded to Dylan Pickering by the University of Sydney, Faculty of Science, School of Psychology.

Competing Interests

Over the last three years, DP has received salary and conference travel costs based on the deed of gift provided by ClubsNSW. DP has received funding for research projects from Gambling Research Exchange Ontario (GREO), and National Association for Gambling Studies (NAGS). AB has received direct and indirect funding over the last three years for research projects, consultancy, honoraria, royalties for published books, costs covering travel expenses to attend conferences and government meetings including from La Loterie Romande (Switzerland), Club NSW (Australia), Comelot (UK), La Française des Jeux (France), Loto-Québec (Québec, Canada), National Lottery (Belgium), Aristocrat Leisure Industries, Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation, Responsible Gambling Trust/GambleAware, Manitoba Gambling Research Program, NSW Office of Liquor, Gaming, & Racing, Gambling Research Australia, National Association for Gambling Studies, USA National Council on Problem Gambling, Le Comité d'organisation Congrès international sur les troubles addictifs, Japan Society for the Behavioral Addiction, and funds from Taylor & Francis for acting as Editor-in-Chief of International Gambling Studies. SG has received direct and indirect funding over the last three years for research projects, consultancy and to cover travel expenses including from NSW Office of Liquor, Gaming and Racing; Australian Media and Communication Authority; British Columbia Lottery Corporation; National Council of Problem Gambling Singapore; Australian Research Council; Australian Department of Social Services; GambleAware; Gambling Research Australia; Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation; National Association for Gambling Studies; Manitoba Gambling Research Program; Ontario Problem Gambling Research Centre; Gambling Research Exchange Ontario; Star/Echo Entertainment; Sportsbet; Crown Melbourne; Community Clubs Victoria; Alberta Gambling Research Institute, Responsible Gambling Council; Financial and Consumer Rights Council.

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May 28th, 3:30 PM May 28th, 4:55 PM

Development and validation of a psychometric instrument to measure recovery in gambling disorder

Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada

Abstract:

The concept of recovery is poorly and inconsistently defined in the gambling field. This is evidenced by an array of different outcomes used to measure treatment effectiveness. As there are no established operational criteria for recovery, it is difficult to compare between studies and determine relative treatment effectiveness. The literature would benefit from a more unified approach to the measurement of recovery. The aim of the current research was to develop and validate a psychometric instrument designed to assess the multiple dimensions of recovery in gambling disorder. The methods used were aligned with best-practice scale development processes. A series of qualitative interviews were conducted with gamblers accessing formal help services to better understand their conceptualisations of recovery. Findings were compared and contrasted with existing treatment literature to form an integrated construct definition. Based on this definition, an initial pool of questionnaire items was developed and then subjected to review and refinement via expert feedback and cognitive pretesting. The final step involved an empirical evaluation of the recovery instrument in a larger sample of gambling treatment service users to analyse reliability, validity, and factor structure. A reliable and valid instrument for recovery will help facilitate higher reporting standards among gambling researchers and clinicians.

Implication statement:

Recovery is a core focus of contemporary mental health service policy internationally. Given demand for evidence-based practices, reliable and valid data is needed to support recovery goals. A psychometrically sound instrument to measure recovery in gambling disorder would enable cross-study comparisons and move the field closer toward establishing best-practice treatment protocols.