Submission Type

Presentation

Submission Title

Cross-Cultural Validation of the Gambling Pathways Questionnaire (GPQ): A Collaborative Approach to Measurement

Session Title

Session 1-4-A: Methods in Problem Gambling Research

Location

Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada

Start Date

28-5-2019 3:30 PM

End Date

28-5-2019 4:55 PM

Disciplines

Clinical Psychology | Social Work

Abstract

ABSTRACT:

The Gambling Pathways Questionnaire (GPQ; Nower & Blaszczynski, 2017) is a 48-item screening instrument, designed to identify etiological risk factors that may go unidentified in treatment but may adversely impact recovery. Researchers in multiple jurisdictions worldwide have undertaken to validate and use the GPQ with culturally diverse groups in partnership with the original authors. This presentation will: 1) provide an overview of the development and validation of the GPQ and initial considerations in designing measures for worldwide administration; and 2) detail the validation of the Italian version of the GPQ, which was administered to 490 treatment-seeking problem gamblers who attended treatment units in Italy (84% males; mean age = 43.77 years, SD=13.25; range = from 18 to 76). Results from the study confirmed the original six-factor structure and three pathways, as well as the reliability of the total scale and subscales. Collaborative solutions to cultural challenges will be discussed.

IMPLICATIONS:

Screening tools for gambling are rarely developed with worldwide generalizability in mind. Replicating the collaborative approach of this cross-cultural collaboration with other instruments should increase the overall validity and application of gambling screening tools and aid in standardizing measurement in studies across jurisdictions.

Keywords

Problem gambling, gambling disorder, etiological sub-typing, screening, assessment, treatment

Author Bio

Lia Nower, J.D., Ph.D. is Professor and Director of the Center for Gambling Studies at Rutgers University. Her research areas include the etiology and treatment of problem gambling, play patterns of online gamblers and sports wagerers, gaming regulation and policy, interactive forms of gaming and gambling, and forensic issues in problem gambling.

Caterina Primi, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor in Psychometrics and she is responsible for the Psychometrics lab at the NEUROFARBA Department (University of Florence, Italy). She is currently conducting research into a number of topics related to test development and adaptation.

Alex Blaszczynski, Ph.D. is Professor Clinical Psychology and Director of the Gambling Treatment and Research Clinic at the University of Sydney. His research interests include interactive gaming and new technologies, responsible gambling and limit-setting, screening and treatment for problem gambling.

Funding Sources

This project was supported by a grant from the Ontario Problem Gambling Research Centre, now Gambling Research Exchange Ontario

Competing Interests

The authors have no financial or non-financial competing interests with this project over the last three years.

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May 28th, 3:30 PM May 28th, 4:55 PM

Cross-Cultural Validation of the Gambling Pathways Questionnaire (GPQ): A Collaborative Approach to Measurement

Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada

ABSTRACT:

The Gambling Pathways Questionnaire (GPQ; Nower & Blaszczynski, 2017) is a 48-item screening instrument, designed to identify etiological risk factors that may go unidentified in treatment but may adversely impact recovery. Researchers in multiple jurisdictions worldwide have undertaken to validate and use the GPQ with culturally diverse groups in partnership with the original authors. This presentation will: 1) provide an overview of the development and validation of the GPQ and initial considerations in designing measures for worldwide administration; and 2) detail the validation of the Italian version of the GPQ, which was administered to 490 treatment-seeking problem gamblers who attended treatment units in Italy (84% males; mean age = 43.77 years, SD=13.25; range = from 18 to 76). Results from the study confirmed the original six-factor structure and three pathways, as well as the reliability of the total scale and subscales. Collaborative solutions to cultural challenges will be discussed.

IMPLICATIONS:

Screening tools for gambling are rarely developed with worldwide generalizability in mind. Replicating the collaborative approach of this cross-cultural collaboration with other instruments should increase the overall validity and application of gambling screening tools and aid in standardizing measurement in studies across jurisdictions.