Submission Type

Presentation

Submission Title

Assessing the public health impact of problem gambling through linkage of primary and secondary data sources

Session Title

Session 2-1-B: Harm and Health

Location

Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada

Start Date

29-5-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

29-5-2019 10:25 AM

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences | Other Social and Behavioral Sciences | Psychology | Public Affairs, Public Policy and Public Administration | Science and Technology Studies | Social and Behavioral Sciences | Social Statistics

Abstract

Primary data collection can be expensive and the data generated for individual projects is often narrowly focused. In contrast, administrative data such as medical claims, birth, and death records can be voluminous but not tailored for research since it is collected and managed by government agencies for practical purposes. However, records of hospitalizations, deaths by suicide, incarceration, or treatment for substance use disorder have enormous public health importance and can provide deep context to the primary data collected for research. Massachusetts has been at the forefront of using administrative data for public health research. Initially, this effort was part of the state’s response to the opioid crisis but has since expanded include other public health priorities. In parallel, the statutes establishing Massachusetts Gaming Commission (MGC) mandated a public health view of the impact of introducing casino gaming into the state. These parallel efforts are merging so player and survey data from MGC funded research can be linked at the individual level to the Massachusetts Public Health Data warehouse (PHD) with more than 20 data sets. PHD offers remote researcher access to its data. This resource offers an unprecedented, longitudinal, census level view of the public health impacts of gambling behavior.

Keywords

Data linkage, public health, gambling research

Author Bio

Thomas Land is an Associate Professor of Clinical Informatics at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Much of his work has involved the data modeling of complex behaviors like preventive care delivered by medical personnel to opioid-related fatal overdoses. Much of Dr. Land’s work have been aimed at improving access to governmental data, enhancing the value of these data, and promoting a culture of collaboration between governmental agencies, academic institutions, and private industry.

Mark Vander Linden currently serves as Director of Research and Responsible Gaming for the Massachusetts Gaming Commission(MGC). In this role he manages the extensive MGC research agendato advance the understanding of responsible gaming, gambling disorders and impacts of casino gambling in Massachusetts. Additionally, he works collaboratively with casino operators and other stakeholders on a range of casino and community-based responsible gaming initiatives. Prior to joining MGC in 2013, Mark was the Executive Officer of the Office of Problem Gambling Treatment and Prevention with the Iowa Department of Public Health. Mark received his Masters in Social Welfare from the University of California Berkeley. Mark has clinical experience in community-based setting with addiction, HIV/AIDS issues, and children and family mental health.

Funding Sources

Massachusetts Gaming Commission

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May 29th, 9:00 AM May 29th, 10:25 AM

Assessing the public health impact of problem gambling through linkage of primary and secondary data sources

Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada

Primary data collection can be expensive and the data generated for individual projects is often narrowly focused. In contrast, administrative data such as medical claims, birth, and death records can be voluminous but not tailored for research since it is collected and managed by government agencies for practical purposes. However, records of hospitalizations, deaths by suicide, incarceration, or treatment for substance use disorder have enormous public health importance and can provide deep context to the primary data collected for research. Massachusetts has been at the forefront of using administrative data for public health research. Initially, this effort was part of the state’s response to the opioid crisis but has since expanded include other public health priorities. In parallel, the statutes establishing Massachusetts Gaming Commission (MGC) mandated a public health view of the impact of introducing casino gaming into the state. These parallel efforts are merging so player and survey data from MGC funded research can be linked at the individual level to the Massachusetts Public Health Data warehouse (PHD) with more than 20 data sets. PHD offers remote researcher access to its data. This resource offers an unprecedented, longitudinal, census level view of the public health impacts of gambling behavior.