Submission Type

Presentation

Session Title

Session 2-1-B: Harm and Health

Location

Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada

Start Date

29-5-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

29-5-2019 10:25 AM

Disciplines

Health Policy | Public Policy | Social Policy

Abstract

As jurisdictions worldwide have overseen gambling expansion, most have implemented regulatory and public policy regimes to reduce harm. This study was conducted to specify the nature and extent of gambling-related harm that public policy efforts could prevent or mitigate in Ontario, Canada.

Research has historically operationalized harm from gambling as cases of disordered gambling; and policy work has focused on the prevalence and treatment of these cases. Recent work to fully conceptualize and measure gambling-related harm in individual gamblers, their families, and communities (Blaszczynski et al, 2015, Browne et al., 2016, 2017; Langham et al., 2016,) dovetailed with the desire of policy makers in Ontario to measure the return on investment (ROI) of harm reduction efforts.

To develop priorities for harm reduction policy-setting, investigators conducted extensive literature reviews, Delphi consensus process, in-depth interviews, and knowledge translation workshops with two informant groups: international research experts on gambling harm; and, Ontario policy leaders from ministries and agencies involved in gambling operation, regulation, and harm reduction.

Findings outline expert opinion of effective evaluation metrics, data requirements, stakeholder roles, and harm reduction strategies. This research contributes methodological and evidentiary guidance for policy makers to identify priority harms and measure ROI from harm reduction programming.

Keywords

Gambling, Gambling harm, Public health, Public policy, Problem gambling, Delphi process

Author Bio

Margo Hilbrecht, PhD (Principal Investigator)

Dr. Hilbrecht is the Director of Knowledge Management and Innovation at Gambling Research Exchange Ontario. She oversees the Evidence Centre, a repository of information resources, datasets, and other materials that help advance knowledge of gambling-related issues. Before joining GREO, Margo was the Associate Director, Research for the Canadian Index of Wellbeing. She holds a PhD in Leisure Studies from the University of Waterloo, and has research expertise in time use, well-being, and the work-leisure relationship.

Judith Glynn, MSc (Co-Investigator and Project Manager)

Judith is Principal, Strategic Science, providing research and social responsibility consulting in gambling and substance use. She has 30+ years experience spanning public policy, scientific research, and marketing/communications. In the late 1990’s Judith led communications for the Ontario Government’s gambling expansion agenda, leaving to manage the largest gambling research program at the Ontario Problem Gambling Research Centre (2000-2012). Judith holds an MSc in Marketing and Consumer Studies, and advisory roles in international gambling organizations.

Funding Sources

This study is financially supported by Gambling Research Exchange Ontario and has received ethics approval from University of Waterloo, where Dr. Hilbrecht is an Adjunct Professor

Competing Interests

none

Comments

Impact Statement

This research used sequential mixed methods to distill large bodies of evidence on gambling-related harm and to build consensus with research and policy experts. The findings contribute practical, evidence-based guidance for researchers and policy makers to collaboratively identify priority harms, implement strategies, and measure ROI on harm reduction programming.

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May 29th, 9:00 AM May 29th, 10:25 AM

Gambling-related harms: Developing priorities for harm reduction policy setting

Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada

As jurisdictions worldwide have overseen gambling expansion, most have implemented regulatory and public policy regimes to reduce harm. This study was conducted to specify the nature and extent of gambling-related harm that public policy efforts could prevent or mitigate in Ontario, Canada.

Research has historically operationalized harm from gambling as cases of disordered gambling; and policy work has focused on the prevalence and treatment of these cases. Recent work to fully conceptualize and measure gambling-related harm in individual gamblers, their families, and communities (Blaszczynski et al, 2015, Browne et al., 2016, 2017; Langham et al., 2016,) dovetailed with the desire of policy makers in Ontario to measure the return on investment (ROI) of harm reduction efforts.

To develop priorities for harm reduction policy-setting, investigators conducted extensive literature reviews, Delphi consensus process, in-depth interviews, and knowledge translation workshops with two informant groups: international research experts on gambling harm; and, Ontario policy leaders from ministries and agencies involved in gambling operation, regulation, and harm reduction.

Findings outline expert opinion of effective evaluation metrics, data requirements, stakeholder roles, and harm reduction strategies. This research contributes methodological and evidentiary guidance for policy makers to identify priority harms and measure ROI from harm reduction programming.