Submission Type

Presentation

Session Title

Session 2-1-C: Gambling Innovation in Policy

Location

Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada

Start Date

29-5-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

29-5-2019 10:25 AM

Disciplines

Gaming Law | Psychology | Public Policy | Recreation Business | Technology and Innovation

Abstract

Abstract

Skill-based gambling machines combine elements of video games (skill, social interaction, competition, achievement and progress) with the random pay-out schedule of electronic gaming machines (EGMs, slots, pokies, VLTs, FOBTS). These new machines are designed to be more engaging than traditional EGMs and specifically appeal to younger generations to address the aging EGM player base apparent in many international jurisdictions. Skill-based gambling machines are currently only legally-provided in a handful of U.S. states. International regulators have expressed concerns regarding the potential for machines to lead to harms due to players misunderstanding the extent to which skill can influence outcomes (illusions of control) and the subsequent capacity for informed consent. The extent to which consumers are interested in playing the new machines is not well understood, making their commercial viability unknown.

This presentation will share research results from two empirical studies examining consumer attitudes towards skill-based gaming machines, their interest and intent to play, and the extent to which they understand the role of skill vs. chance. Participants were recruited online and from U.S. casinos which provide skill-based gaming machines and completed surveys after exposure to the machines.

Implications

This presentation will provide research evidence regarding two important questions for researchers, regulators, policy makers, and industry professionals about skill-based gambling machines: Who is likely to play these? And Do consumers understand how skill-based gambling machines work?

Acknowledgment

This research was conducted with assistance from GameCo. The efforts of Mr. Blaine Graboyes and Ms. Danielle Rosenberg to facilitate participant recruitment are greatly appreciated.

Funding

This work was supported by an Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Research Award [DE1060100459] awarded to Dr. Sally Gainsbury. In-kind support for this research was provided by GameCo.

Keywords

skill gambling, video gaming machines, gambling policy, illusions of control, millennial

Author Bio

Presenting author bio: Dr. Sally Gainsbury is the Deputy Director of the Gambling Treatment and Research Clinic within the Brain and Mind Centre, and Senior Lecturer within the School of Psychology at University of Sydney. She is Editor of International Gambling Studies. Her research focuses on the impact of emerging technologies on gambling, harms, and other behavioral addictions and developing interventions to enhance well-being and minimize harms.

Co-author bios

Dr. Kahlil Philander is a gambling economist, an Assistant Professor at Washington State University's Carson College of Business, and research affiliate at the University of Sydney School of Psychology. Previously, he oversaw the GameSense responsible gambling program as Director of Social Responsibility at BCLC and served as Director of Research at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas International Gaming Institute.

Ms. Georgia Grattan has recently completed her Bachelor of Psychology with Honours at the University of Sydney. She completed an internship and worked as a research assistant within the Gambling Treatment and Research Clinic in the Brain and Mind Centre.

Funding Sources

Acknowledgment This research was conducted with assistance from GameCo. The efforts of Mr. Blaine Graboyes and Ms. Danielle Rosenberg to facilitate participant recruitment are greatly appreciated. Funding This work was supported by an Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Research Award [DE1060100459] awarded to Dr. Sally Gainsbury. In-kind support for this research was provided by GameCo.

Competing Interests

SG and KP have received funding, in-kind support, and compensation for travel from government, gambling industry, and community groups related to the gambling field. GG has no competing interests to report.

Comments

This abstract is intended to supersede the previous submission in terms of preference for being accepted as it is considered to have a greater appeal to the conference delegates.

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May 29th, 9:00 AM May 29th, 10:25 AM

Skill-based Gambling Machines: Consumer attitudes and capacity for informed choice

Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada

Abstract

Skill-based gambling machines combine elements of video games (skill, social interaction, competition, achievement and progress) with the random pay-out schedule of electronic gaming machines (EGMs, slots, pokies, VLTs, FOBTS). These new machines are designed to be more engaging than traditional EGMs and specifically appeal to younger generations to address the aging EGM player base apparent in many international jurisdictions. Skill-based gambling machines are currently only legally-provided in a handful of U.S. states. International regulators have expressed concerns regarding the potential for machines to lead to harms due to players misunderstanding the extent to which skill can influence outcomes (illusions of control) and the subsequent capacity for informed consent. The extent to which consumers are interested in playing the new machines is not well understood, making their commercial viability unknown.

This presentation will share research results from two empirical studies examining consumer attitudes towards skill-based gaming machines, their interest and intent to play, and the extent to which they understand the role of skill vs. chance. Participants were recruited online and from U.S. casinos which provide skill-based gaming machines and completed surveys after exposure to the machines.

Implications

This presentation will provide research evidence regarding two important questions for researchers, regulators, policy makers, and industry professionals about skill-based gambling machines: Who is likely to play these? And Do consumers understand how skill-based gambling machines work?

Acknowledgment

This research was conducted with assistance from GameCo. The efforts of Mr. Blaine Graboyes and Ms. Danielle Rosenberg to facilitate participant recruitment are greatly appreciated.

Funding

This work was supported by an Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Research Award [DE1060100459] awarded to Dr. Sally Gainsbury. In-kind support for this research was provided by GameCo.