Submission Type

Presentation

Submission Title

Results of Problem Gambling Research in 11 Native American Tribal Communities in Nevada

Session Title

Session 3-4-A: Problem Gambling Behaviors and Prevention

Location

Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada

Start Date

30-5-2019 3:30 PM

End Date

30-5-2019 4:55 PM

Disciplines

Community-Based Research

Abstract

Between 2015 and 2017, a 57-question survey instrument on gambling behaviors and attitudes was administered at community health events in 11 Native American tribal communities in Nevada. Data collected using the Canadian Problem Gambling Severity Index indicate that the rate of problem gambling in tribal communities may be double that of the general Nevada adult population. Open-ended questions confirm that many tribal members view problem gambling as a public health issue in their communities, and also indicate a general willingness to engage in discussing and finding solutions to address the problem.

Data obtained from the survey provide a path forward for engaging tribal leadership in developing and implementing future problem gambling awareness and treatment strategies.

Keywords

Gambling, addiction, Native American, public health, awareness, treatment

Author Bio

William "Ted" Hartwell: Mr. Hartwell holds a Masters degree in Anthropology and has served on the research faculty of the Desert Research Institute since 1991. A problem gambler in long-term recovery, he promotes awareness, prevention, and treatment of problem gambling as a Community Engagement Liaison for the Nevada Council on Problem Gambling. He was the 2014 Shannon L. Bybee Award recipient for his continuing work on advocacy, outreach, and research on the issue of problem gambling.

Sydney Smith: Ms. Smith holds a Masters degree in Clinical Psychology and maintains licensure as an LPC and LADC, and is also a Nationally Certified Gambling Counselor. She previously served as Clinical Director of Family Services for the International Problem Gambling Center and as Clinical Director of Vencer Youth Services in Las Vegas. She is currently CEO and Clinical Director of RISE Center for Recovery in Las Vegas, Nevada. She was the 2016 Shannon L. Bybee Award recipient for her continuing work on advocacy, education, and research on the issue of problem gambling.

Funding Sources

This study was funded by the Desert Research Institute's Lander Endowment. While the researchers are employees of the Desert Research Institute at the time research was being carried out, administrators of the grant had no direct involvement in developing or implementing the study.

Competing Interests

Mr. Hartwell receives funding as a consultant to the Nevada Council on Problem Gambling, and Ms. Smith has received grant monies in the past for implementing some of the Nevada Council on Problem Gambling's awareness programs.

Share

COinS
 
May 30th, 3:30 PM May 30th, 4:55 PM

Results of Problem Gambling Research in 11 Native American Tribal Communities in Nevada

Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada

Between 2015 and 2017, a 57-question survey instrument on gambling behaviors and attitudes was administered at community health events in 11 Native American tribal communities in Nevada. Data collected using the Canadian Problem Gambling Severity Index indicate that the rate of problem gambling in tribal communities may be double that of the general Nevada adult population. Open-ended questions confirm that many tribal members view problem gambling as a public health issue in their communities, and also indicate a general willingness to engage in discussing and finding solutions to address the problem.

Data obtained from the survey provide a path forward for engaging tribal leadership in developing and implementing future problem gambling awareness and treatment strategies.