Submission Type

Presentation

Submission Title

Examining Gambling-Related Problems and Participation-Related Motivations among a Sample of Daily Fantasy Sports Players

Session Title

Session 3-2-B: Understanding Daily Fantasy Sports from the Inside: Results from the Division on Addiction – DraftKings Research Collaborative

Location

Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada

Start Date

30-5-2019 11:00 AM

End Date

30-5-2019 12:25 PM

Disciplines

Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms | Clinical Psychology | Sports Studies

Abstract

Abstract: Daily fantasy sports (DFS) are a relatively new form of fantasy sports where participants play contests over a short duration of time (e.g., day or weekend). Previous studies have found associations between traditional season-long fantasy sport participation and experiencing gambling-related problems. Previous studies have also assessed motivations for fantasy sport play among season-long fantasy sport players. The purpose of this study was to examine gambling-related problems and participation-related motivations among a sample of DFS players. An online (Qualtrics) survey was utilized to examine DFS participation (frequency), DFS-related motivations, and gambling-related problems among a sample of DFS participants (N=178). Participants were paid survey takers recruited by Qualtrics in April 2018. Inclusion criteria included being at least 18 years old and playing DFS at least 2-3 times in the past year. We examined the number of past-year gambling-related problems (using DSM-5 gambling disorder criteria) reported in this sample and whether there is a correlation between gambling-related problems and frequency of DFS play. In addition, we examined participant rankings of 12 motivations for participating in DFS. We will discuss how these findings compare to those found in previous studies among traditional season-long fantasy sport players.

Implications: This study extends previous fantasy sports research by examining gambling problems and motivations among daily fantasy sport (DFS) participants. Because DFS contests are more frequent and shorter in duration than traditional season-long contests, there are likely differences in the variables of interest between DFS players and season-long players.

Keywords

daily fantasy sports, gambling, gambling problems, motivations

Author Bio

Dr. Ryan J. Martin is an Associate Professor in the Department of Health Education and Promotion at East Carolina University (ECU). Ryan earned his Ph.D. in Health Education and Promotion at the University of Alabama and served a 2-year appointment as the Thomas N. Cummings Fellow at the Division on Addiction and the Massachusetts Council on Compulsive Gambling. Ryan’s research interests include gambling behavior, addictive behaviors, and fantasy sport participation.

Funding Sources

This research project was internally funded through East Carolina University (ECU). Other than IRB approval, ECU had no involvement in any aspects of the research.

Competing Interests

Ryan Martin is a paid consultant for the Division on Addiction DraftKings research contract.

Comments

Please group this paper on a panel with other DFS papers by Nelson, LaPlante, and Edson.

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May 30th, 11:00 AM May 30th, 12:25 PM

Examining Gambling-Related Problems and Participation-Related Motivations among a Sample of Daily Fantasy Sports Players

Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada

Abstract: Daily fantasy sports (DFS) are a relatively new form of fantasy sports where participants play contests over a short duration of time (e.g., day or weekend). Previous studies have found associations between traditional season-long fantasy sport participation and experiencing gambling-related problems. Previous studies have also assessed motivations for fantasy sport play among season-long fantasy sport players. The purpose of this study was to examine gambling-related problems and participation-related motivations among a sample of DFS players. An online (Qualtrics) survey was utilized to examine DFS participation (frequency), DFS-related motivations, and gambling-related problems among a sample of DFS participants (N=178). Participants were paid survey takers recruited by Qualtrics in April 2018. Inclusion criteria included being at least 18 years old and playing DFS at least 2-3 times in the past year. We examined the number of past-year gambling-related problems (using DSM-5 gambling disorder criteria) reported in this sample and whether there is a correlation between gambling-related problems and frequency of DFS play. In addition, we examined participant rankings of 12 motivations for participating in DFS. We will discuss how these findings compare to those found in previous studies among traditional season-long fantasy sport players.

Implications: This study extends previous fantasy sports research by examining gambling problems and motivations among daily fantasy sport (DFS) participants. Because DFS contests are more frequent and shorter in duration than traditional season-long contests, there are likely differences in the variables of interest between DFS players and season-long players.