Document Type

Article

Publication Date

11-16-2019

Publication Title

HIV & AIDS Review

Publisher

Elsevier

Volume

18

Issue

4

First page number:

233

Last page number:

238

Abstract

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated neurocognitive disorder is an emergent public health problem known to HIV researchers and scientists, but unfortunately, is a concern that still needs to be better recognized by people living with HIV and HIV service providers. Research studies have reported that between 30 to 50% of people living with HIV who have access to combination antiretroviral therapy are and will be affected by this disorder. This raises the need to find more appropriate research approaches for examining issues that will significantly impact people living with HIV experiencing or at risk of developing neurocognitive impairments. People living with HIV who are symptomatic of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder are more likely to have mental health issues, progression to dementia, difficulties in performing activities of daily living, lower medication adherence, access barriers to adequate health and social services, and poorer quality of life. Because of its key principles and tenets, community-based research is a viable alternative to traditional research approaches for examining mental health and support services issues related to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder. As an alternative approach, it would be able to examine issues relevant to people infected and affected by HIV in considerable depth and detail while taking into account their greater and more meaningful involvement. Community-based research would be able to ensure people living with HIV and HIV service providers opportunities for equal participation, productive partnerships, ownership of new knowledge, shared responsibilities, and empowerment in HIV research processes dedicated to help them address issues related to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder.

Keywords

HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder; Community-based research; Mental health; Support services; People living with HIV/AIDS; Service providers

Disciplines

Community Psychology | Psychiatric and Mental Health | Virus Diseases

File Format

pdf

File Size

147 KB

Language

English

Available for download on Monday, November 16, 2020

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