Title

Interpreting pediatric intelligence tests: a framework from evidence-based medicine

Document Type

Book Section

Publication Date

3-1-2019

Publication Title

Handbook of Psychological Assessment

Publisher

Elsevier

Edition

4th

First page number:

65

Last page number:

101

Abstract

This chapter focuses on intelligence testing with children and adolescents. Measuring individual differences in abilities is one of the foundations of modern psychology. Despite more than a century of studying intelligence, no universal definition of intelligence exists and tests of intelligence have been developed that are associated with meaningful outcomes. Individually administered intelligence tests are frequently undertaken as part of a psychologist’s assessment battery of children and adolescents. However, how intelligence tests are interpreted vary from clinician to clinician along two dimensions. Psychologists may interpret an intelligence test along a qualitative–quantitative dimension and along an idiographic–nomothetic dimension. Evidence-based assessment offers psychologists a unifying framework consisting of three Ps for evaluating clinical utility of a test. A test can predict a meaningful outcome such as a diagnosis. A test can prescribe a specific treatment. A test can be used to monitor process in treatment. Two recent editions of frequently used intelligence tests—the Wechsler Intelligence Scales for Children and the Woodcock–Johnson Tests of Cognitive Abilities—are also reviewed.

Keywords

Intelligence; Binet-simon scale; Comprehension; Orectic; Army alpha

Disciplines

Child Psychology | Medical Specialties | Medicine and Health Sciences | Pediatrics | Psychology | Social and Behavioral Sciences

Language

English

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