Award Date

1-1-2000

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Communication Studies

First Committee Member

Richard Jensen

Number of Pages

76

Abstract

Little academic research exists of the American Indian takeover of the hamlet of Wounded Knee, South Dakota in 1973. This thesis is an analysis of the discourse of the Wounded Knee incident, which served dual purposes for the activists. First, American Indian discourse served as a reinforcing agent to American Indians, both at Wounded Knee and across the country. Second, the rhetoric was meant to effect change within the general American public. This thesis will adopt and expand on Randall Lake's 1983 theory of the consummatory function of rhetoric by dissecting the fascinating discourse that shaped the identity of the Wounded Knee incident and the public perception of American Indians and the American Indian Movement (AIM) during this era.

Keywords

Consummatory; Discourse; Function; Instrumental; Knee; Militant; South Dakota; Wounded

Controlled Subject

Rhetoric; Political science

File Format

pdf

File Size

2293.76 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/a812-n4bc


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