Award Date

1-1-2000

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Theatre

First Committee Member

Davey Marlin-Jones

Number of Pages

45

Abstract

Hamlet: Red, an adaptation proposes an in-depth method of teaching Shakespeare's works by reconstructing the literature so it is relative to the cultural context of its students. This proposal focuses specifically on Hamlet as studied by at-risk middle schoolers. Beginning with a vital teacher-student rapport, the process continues through selection of a text based upon the dynamics of the students, analysis and rewriting of that text based upon its themes that relate to the students, and final production of the completed adaptation; Complexities arise when teachers, concerned with positively influencing each of their students, are faced with tremendous diversity in the classroom and inevitable constraints on instructional time. Bold, non-traditional teaching styles are sometimes required to reach our changing teen population. Evidence of these styles can even be found in our modern entertainment. For example, at-risk teens were recently depicted in the films Dangerous Minds and Stand and Deliver, in which the lives of these students were transformed because the teachers were courageous enough to be non-traditional. People with an innate passion for teaching are the types of educators who are willing to explore ideas like those asserted in this particular thesis project, which requires an open-mind and indiscriminate patience and love for students.

Keywords

Adaptation; Hamlet; Red; William Shakespeare

Controlled Subject

Theater; Language arts; British literature; English literature--Irish authors; Irish literature

File Format

pdf

File Size

1331.2 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/6vn0-fbcf


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