Award Date

1-1-2000

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Geoscience

First Committee Member

Eugene I. Smith

Number of Pages

111

Abstract

The McCullough Pass Caldera is a small caldera in southern Nevada formed by the eruption of the McCullough Pass rhyolites. The McCullough Pass rhyolites erupted as three successive rhyolitic magma batches from 14.12 to 13.98 Ma and produced the McCullough Pass caldera. Each magma batch was chemically zoned by sidewall crystallization prior to erupting. The first magma batch erupted to produce the McCullough Pass tuff and caused collapse of the Jean Lake caldera along a ring fracture identified by the pattern of Jean Lake domes. The second magma batch produced the Ramhead rhyolite and resulted in collapse of the Ramhead caldera. The third magma batch produced dikes, domes and flows of the Capstone rhyolite, which produced a topographic high. The topographic high prohibited Hidden Valley andesite, which erupted from a cinder cone field surrounding the McCullough Pass caldera, from flowing into the caldera. After volcanism had ended, preferential erosion of the McCullough Pass rhyolites produced the present topographic low known as the McCullough Pass caldera.

Keywords

Caldera; Clark County; Evolution; Mccullough; Nevada; Pass; Silicic; Small; System

Controlled Subject

Geology; Geochemistry

File Format

pdf

File Size

3184.64 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/4e8p-m2rk


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