Award Date

1-1-2000

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Chemistry

First Committee Member

Brian J. Johnson

Number of Pages

61

Abstract

Chlorine is used extensively in the chemical industry and for disinfection of drinking water. Many methods have been reported for the determination of chlorine species. Fluorescence quenching to determine chlorine is a promising method because of its high sensitivity and selectivity. This study focuses on development of a sulfonamide-based collection system for low levels of chlorine in air. Quantitation of chlorine is based on the quenching of the fluorescence signal observed when chlorine reacts with the fluorescent sulfonamide compound. Both a direct fluorimetric and a fluorescence-HPLC method have been established. Linear relationships are found between the fluorescence intensity or HPLC peak area and the amount of chlorine. Detection limits are in the ppb range or better. These methods have been applied to water samples. Experiments have also shown that sulfonamide-treated dihydroxypropylated silica can effectively collect gas-phase chlorine.

Keywords

Chlorine; Determination; Fluorescence; Quenching

Controlled Subject

Chemistry, Analytic

File Format

pdf

File Size

1351.68 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/6psa-l381


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