Award Date

1-1-2000

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Sociology

First Committee Member

Ronald W. Smith

Number of Pages

113

Abstract

This thesis examines differences between African American and White political participation. Drawing from the theoretical assumptions of pluralism and structural functionalism, the thesis conceptualizes that voter turnout can be evaluated by comparing socioeconomic, socioreligious, and political variables. In analyzing data from the 1992 and 1996 National Election Studies, the thesis reveals that Whites disproportionately have a higher rate of voter turnout as compared to African Americans. The data further suggest that socioreligious variables, such as church attendance, are powerful explanatory variables for encouraging voter participation by African Americans.

Keywords

African; American; Analysis; Comparative; Elections; Participatory; Presidential; Resources; Turnout; Voter

Controlled Subject

Demography; Political science; Blacks--Study and teaching

File Format

pdf

File Size

2488.32 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/miza-npeo


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