Award Date

1-1-2000

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Social Work (MSW)

Department

Social Work

First Committee Member

Ramona Denby

Number of Pages

113

Abstract

Abuse and neglect of children has been a recognized problem in America for many years. Recent developments in the child welfare system have introduced intensive, family-based services, otherwise known as family preservation services. The aim is to preserve the family and provide reasonable efforts to avoid out of home placement. State and private family preservation programs across the country have been faced with the challenge of evaluating program effectiveness and to better meet the needs of client populations by enhancing treatment models and programs; The Nevada State Division of Child and Family Services (DCFS) has utilized valuable resources to evaluate their Intensive Family Preservation (IFP) service program to discover its effectiveness. The program has been the subject of a longitudinal study. Research data from the 1999 fiscal year was used to examine the effectiveness of the Functional Family Therapy (FFT) model on substance-involved families. This secondary analysis discovered that the preservation services in Las Vegas are effective but that substance involved families have significantly lower outcome scores. The data revealed that substance-involved families also have larger households and less income than non-substance users.

Keywords

Client; Effectiveness; Family; Functional; Involved; Preservation; Substance; Therapy

Controlled Subject

Social service; Clinical psychology

File Format

pdf

File Size

2621.44 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/inlh-doif


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