Award Date

1-1-2001

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

First Committee Member

Christopher Kearney

Number of Pages

62

Abstract

Forty-four families whose children were tested for Separation Anxiety Disorder three years ago were again contacted for a follow-up study focusing on stability of the diagnosis over time and the associative characteristics of parent pathology and aspects of their family environment. Children were diagnosed with either no symptoms of separation anxiety, subclinical symptoms of separation anxiety (1 or 2 symptoms), or clinical Separation Anxiety Disorder (3 or more symptoms). Parent pathology focused on depression, obsessive/compulsive, phobic anxiety, and somatization. Family environment examined parental control and level of expression in the family. Current levels of parental pathology were found to be associated with both current and previous levels of Separation Anxiety. However, there was a decrease in diagnosis severity over time, so the hypothesis that Separation Anxiety Disorder is a stable disorder was not supported.

Keywords

Anxiety; Child; Correlates; Disorders; Environment; Family; Parent; Pathology; Separation

Controlled Subject

Clinical psychology; Social psychology

File Format

pdf

File Size

1576.96 KB

Degree Grantor

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Language

English

Permissions

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Identifier

https://doi.org/10.25669/15v6-2klp


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